You are here

Policy

 

As part of the Senate’s flurry of action on proposals to repeal and/or replace the Affordable Care Act, Republicans brought up the same bill to get rid much of the law, without a replacement ready, which had passed through Congress in 2015. This time, it failed, with seven Republicans and all Democrats voting against it.

Republicans in the U.S. Senate voted to open debate on repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act (ACA), with 50 senators voting in favor of what’s called a motion to proceed, or MTP, opening the door to the chamber offering numerous amendments to craft some sort of repeal bill. The first option put forward—the Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA)—failed to pass as expected.

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) has released reports on two Republican proposals regarding the Affordable Care Act: One which would repeal much of the law while delaying some of those effects for two years and another which replaces it with the Senate's Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA).

Enrollment in the individual market would increase while premiums would decrease under Sen. Ted Cruz’s, R-Texas, controversial “Consumer Freedom” amendment, according to an HHS analysis obtained by the Washington Examiner.

Senate Republicans' latest Affordable Care Act replacement plan was introduced on July 13. Four days later, it was declared dead, as four Republican senators had publicly announced they wouldn’t support even holding a vote on the legislation.

 

Recent Headlines

ACA ‘repeal-and-delay’ bill fails in Senate as industry worries about ‘skinny repeal’

As part of the Senate’s flurry of action on proposals to repeal and/or replace the Affordable Care Act, Republicans brought up the same bill to get rid much of the law, without a replacement ready, which had passed through Congress in 2015. This time, it failed, with seven Republicans and all Democrats voting against it.

Senate opens debate on ACA repeal; BCRA fails to pass

Republicans in the U.S. Senate voted to open debate on repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act (ACA), with 50 senators voting in favor of what’s called a motion to proceed, or MTP, opening the door to the chamber offering numerous amendments to craft some sort of repeal bill. The first option put forward—the Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA)—failed to pass as expected.

CBO scores 2 Republican healthcare bills

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) has released reports on two Republican proposals regarding the Affordable Care Act: One which would repeal much of the law while delaying some of those effects for two years and another which replaces it with the Senate's Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA).

HHS: Allowing non-ACA compliant insurance lowers premiums, assumes $12k deductibles

Enrollment in the individual market would increase while premiums would decrease under Sen. Ted Cruz’s, R-Texas, controversial “Consumer Freedom” amendment, according to an HHS analysis obtained by the Washington Examiner.

Senate Republicans’ healthcare plans collapse

Senate Republicans' latest Affordable Care Act replacement plan was introduced on July 13. Four days later, it was declared dead, as four Republican senators had publicly announced they wouldn’t support even holding a vote on the legislation.

Durbin: Some Republicans waiting on ACA repeal to fail to start bipartisan talks

U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Illinois, believes opponents of the Senate’s Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA) can use a delay in considering the bill to convince undecided Republicans to block it, particularly now that health insurers have come out strongly against the legislation.

Hospitals remain opposed to Senate healthcare bill; AMA sees slight improvement

Whenever Republicans in the House or Senate have released a new version of an Affordable Care Act (ACA) replacement plan in 2017, healthcare industry reaction has been almost uniformly negative. The same can largely be said for the newest version of the Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA), with the notable exception of the American Medical Association (AMA) when it comes to two provisions. 

New Senate healthcare bill allows insurance plans with fewer benefits, keeps Medicaid cuts

Senate Republicans have released a new version of their Affordable Care Act (ACA) replacement plan, adding new funding for stabilizing the individual market and keeping more of the ACA’s taxes, while also including a controversial proposal to allow insurance plans which don’t comply with ACA regulations on benefits and community rating.

House passes FDA user fee reauthorization, Senate schedule unclear

The House has passed legislation to reauthorize user fee programs through the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) affecting medical devices, prescription and generic drugs.

AHIP: Market instability, higher premiums for sicker enrollees under Cruz amendment

America’s Health Insurance Plans (AHIP), health insurers’ largest lobbying group, has been largely silent on Senate Republicans’ version on an Affordable Care Act (ACA) replacement plan, but now is warning against a conservative amendment to allow insurers to now offer plans which don’t comply with ACA regulations.

Pages