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Quality

 

University of Michigan researchers found no association between prescribing more opioid painkillers to postoperative patients and higher pain management scores on patient satisfaction surveys, undercutting physicians’ perceptions that they’ve been incentivized to prescribe the potentially addictive drugs.  

Posting about nursing home residents on Facebook, Snapchat or other forms of social media “violates more codes than you could ever imagine,” according to the Joint Commission, which advised facilities to draft their own social media policies.

CMS had expected more than half of Medicare providers to be exempt from the new Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) in its first year. That ended up being a low estimate, as CMS said 65 percent have been notified they won’t be participating in MIPS for 2017.

The claims that larger, higher priced providers outperform lower-priced practices on quality and efficiency of care don’t hold up, according to a new study from Harvard Medical School researchers.

Chip Kahn, president and CEO of the Federation of American Hospitals, gave a harsh assessment of current quality measurement processes at a Health Affairs forum in Washington, D.C. 

 

Recent Headlines

Largest verdict against device maker? $454 million awarded in hospital gown lawsuit

Kimberly-Clark Corporation, known for its Kleenex tissues and Huggies diapers, has been hit with a $454 million jury verdict over a lawsuit claiming a former subsidiary misled buyers about the impermeability of its MicroCool surgical gowns.

Previews of your hospital’s star rating, quality data now available

Hospitals in CMS’s Inpatient Quality Reporting, Outpatient Quality Reporting and Prospective Payment System-Exempt Cancer Hospital Quality Reporting programs can take an early look at the star rating and quality data before the public gets to see it later this year.

Improving patient experience is not ‘just about making the patients happy’

Bon Secours Baltimore Health System has been called a facility “in the worst of America’s healthcare system,” serving the same areas depicted in the HBO crime drama “The Wire” and near the site of riots in 2015. 

Patient experience can be indicator of hospital financial performance

Performance on patient experience scores can impact the cash flow and operating profit margins of hospitals, which may mean organizations have to align quality metrics and leadership to influence patients’ perceptions of their care.

Summa Health loses appeal to save accreditation for ER residency program

Accreditation won’t be restored to the emergency department residency program at Ohio-based Summa Health System after its appeal was denied by the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education (ACGME).

D.C. hospital first to receive Joint Commission/AABB blood transfusion certification

The Joint Commission and the AABB (formerly the American Association of Blood Banks) has awarded its first Patient Blood Management Certification to MedStar-Georgetown University Hospital in Washington, D.C.

Joint Commission proposes changes to patient suicide risk policies

The Joint Commission has begun accepting comments on proposed revisions to National Patient Safety Goal (NPSG) requirements to “better identify and care” for patients who may be at risk of attempting suicide.

Mortality improves during surprise Joint Commission inspections

When Joint Commission inspectors are conducting hospital surveys, 30-day mortality rates “significantly” improve, according to a new study published in JAMA Internal Medicine.

IHI, National Patient Safety Foundation to merge

The Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) and the National Patient Safety Foundation (NPSF) have announced plans to merge into a single organization to “help reset and reenergize the patient safety agenda.”

Bigger practices may not mean better care for high-needs patients

A larger practice doesn’t translate to better care for patients with multiple conditions, but having greater experience treating high-needs patients just might, according to a study published in the March issue of Health Affairs.

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