You are here

Policy

 

The Senate’s ongoing debate of plans to repeal and/or replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has resulted in two separate Republicans plans being voted down. One hope for the party is to pass a so-called “skinny repeal” which eliminates the individual and employer mandates along with a medical device tax, but that approach would have an immediate impact on insurance coverage and premiums.

As part of the Senate’s flurry of action on proposals to repeal and/or replace the Affordable Care Act, Republicans brought up the same bill to get rid much of the law, without a replacement ready, which had passed through Congress in 2015. This time, it failed, with seven Republicans and all Democrats voting against it.

Republicans in the U.S. Senate voted to open debate on repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act (ACA), with 50 senators voting in favor of what’s called a motion to proceed, or MTP, opening the door to the chamber offering numerous amendments to craft some sort of repeal bill. The first option put forward—the Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA)—failed to pass as expected.

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) has released reports on two Republican proposals regarding the Affordable Care Act: One which would repeal much of the law while delaying some of those effects for two years and another which replaces it with the Senate's Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA).

Enrollment in the individual market would increase while premiums would decrease under Sen. Ted Cruz’s, R-Texas, controversial “Consumer Freedom” amendment, according to an HHS analysis obtained by the Washington Examiner.

 

Recent Headlines

5 things to know on deregulation, Medicaid from HHS Secretary's CNN event

HHS Secretary Tom Price, MD, weighed in on a number of healthcare issues during a March 15 CNN town hall-style event, focusing mainly on defending the Republican-sponsored replacement for the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

ACA exchange enrollment falls short of projections for 2017

Some 12.2 million people purchased health insurance through the Affordable Care Act (ACA) exchanges in the last open enrollment period, half a million fewer than in the 2016 and well below the 13.8 million projected by HHS under the Obama administration.

‘Unacceptable’ coverage losses drive hospital, doctor opposition to ACA replacement bill

Hospital groups, the American Medical Association (AMA) and several other healthcare organizations said they can’t support the American Health Care Act (ACHA), the Republican-sponsored replacement for the Affordable Care Act (ACA), after an estimate that 24 million more people would become uninsured by 2026 if the bill becomes law. 

CBO on ACA replacement: 24 million more uninsured, premiums lower by 2026

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimates the gains in insurance coverage from the Affordable Care Act (ACA) would be wiped out if its Republican-sponsored replacement, the American Health Care Act (AHCA), is enacted. 

HHS Secretary Price encourages states to use ACA waivers for reinsurance, high-risk pools

While supporting the current proposal to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA), HHS Secretary Tom Price, MD, encouraged states to submit more “innovation waivers” as allowed under the ACA to form their own reinsurance programs and fund pools to cover high-cost patients.

Anthem supports ACA replacement legislation

The second-largest health insurer in the U.S., Anthem, has come out in support of provisions in the Republican-sponsored replacement for the Affordable Care Act (ACA), going against the opposition expressed by the American Medical Association (AMA) and concerns from its own industry group. 

‘Patients before politics': AMA launches site focused on ACA repeal debate

After coming out in opposition to the American Health Care Act (AHCA), the Republican-sponsored plan to replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the American Medical Association (AMA) is stepping up efforts to get physicians involved in the legislative conversation through a new website.

The potential impact of the Republican ACA replacement

Health policy analyses predict 15 million people could lose their health coverage and 30 million could be subject to surcharges on top of premiums if the Republican-sponsored American Health Care Act (AHCA) goes into effect.

‘Critically flawed’: Industry groups blast Republican ACA replacement

The initial reaction to the American Health Care Act (AHCA), the legislation to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA) introduced by Republican leaders in Congress and supported by President Donald Trump, is negative across several major medical organizations, including the American Medical Association and the Federation of American Hospitals. 

5 things hospitals, insurers should know about Republicans' ACA replacement

House Republicans have released the full text of the long-awaited legislation to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Titled the “American Health Care Act (AHCA),” the bill would eliminate the ACA’s mandate for individuals to buy insurance and roll back the expansion of Medicaid, while restoring disproportionate share hospital (DSH) payments.

Pages