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As part of the Senate’s flurry of action on proposals to repeal and/or replace the Affordable Care Act, Republicans brought up the same bill to get rid much of the law, without a replacement ready, which had passed through Congress in 2015. This time, it failed, with seven Republicans and all Democrats voting against it.

Republicans in the U.S. Senate voted to open debate on repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act (ACA), with 50 senators voting in favor of what’s called a motion to proceed, or MTP, opening the door to the chamber offering numerous amendments to craft some sort of repeal bill. The first option put forward—the Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA)—failed to pass as expected.

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) has released reports on two Republican proposals regarding the Affordable Care Act: One which would repeal much of the law while delaying some of those effects for two years and another which replaces it with the Senate's Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA).

Enrollment in the individual market would increase while premiums would decrease under Sen. Ted Cruz’s, R-Texas, controversial “Consumer Freedom” amendment, according to an HHS analysis obtained by the Washington Examiner.

Senate Republicans' latest Affordable Care Act replacement plan was introduced on July 13. Four days later, it was declared dead, as four Republican senators had publicly announced they wouldn’t support even holding a vote on the legislation.

 

Recent Headlines

Blue Cross Blue Shield steps in as lone exchange insurer in some Tennessee markets

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Tennessee plans on selling individual market plans next year in the Knoxsville area, which had been in danger of having no participating insurer on the Affordable Care Act exchanges for 2018.

HHS criticized over ‘potentially illegal’ memo

Republicans in Congress were critical of a memo circulated to HHS employees instructing them not to speak to federal lawmakers or their staffs without first clearing it with department leadership, saying it may infringe on the rights of whistleblowers.

Q&A: Healthcare lobbyist predicts AHCA will die due to House-Senate disagreement

Major medical organizations appeared united in opposition to the American Health Care Act (AHCA), yet House Republicans passed the bill without making any changes those groups wanted. Julius Hobson Jr., former director of congressional affairs for the AMA who now works for law firm Polsinelli, told HealthExec there’s an obvious answer: campaign promises.

ACA replacement plan likely to change in Senate

Assuming no Democrats defect this time around, Republicans can only afford two “no” votes among their members, with Vice President Mike Pence breaking a 50-50 tie. 

Healthcare industry ‘deeply disappointed’ by House passage of AHCA

Many major medical associations quickly spoke out against the American Health Care Act (AHCA), calling the Republican-sponsored plan to replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA) “bad policy” that could “destabilize our healthcare system,” after it passed by a narrow margin in the House May 4. 

ACA replacement passes in House despite healthcare industry objections

The Republican majority in the House was successful in passing the American Health Care Act (AHCA), its plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA), by a narrow margin of 217-213 over objections about how it could affect people with pre-existing conditions and resistance from major healthcare associations.

Healthcare groups trash new ACA replacement plan: ‘It’s simply bad policy’

The changes made to the American Health Care Act (AHCA), the Republican-sponsored legislation to replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA), have only strengthened opposition to the bill from groups representing hospitals, internists and emergency physicians. 

5 things to know about Republicans’ amended ACA replacement plan

Republicans leaders in Congress have reportedly agreed on a new version of their Affordable Care Act (ACA) repeal-and-replace plan, allowing states to opt out of ACA requirements such as essential health benefits and a ban on individually rating customers on the individual market. 

Major medical groups, hospitals split on ending mandatory bundled payments

The move by CMS to delay mandatory bundled payments for cardiac and orthopedic care was widely supported by medical associations and health systems, judging by their comments to the agency, but some went further, calling for these initiatives from the prior administration be made into voluntary programs.

Cutting off ACA insurer subsidies would raise—not lower—federal healthcare spending

If the Trump administration’s goal is to lower federal healthcare spending, discontinuing cost-sharing reduction subsidies, or CSRs, to insurers under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) could backfire, according to an analysis from the Kaiser Family Foundation.

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