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Care Delivery

 

The total number of licensed physicians has increased by 12 percent since 2010, with women and Doctors of Osteopathic Medicine (DOs) making up a greater share of the physician population, according to a report released by the Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB).

Walla Walla General Hospital in Washington has been closed by owner Adventist Health, citing financial challenges and a failed plan to transfer ownership Providence Health & Services.

There appears to be a direct link between hospitals’ initiatives to improve blood use stewardship and a 20 percent decrease in blood utilization for 134 diagnoses which make up 80 percent of red blood cell usage.

Most healthcare organizations with revenue under $1 billion surveyed by the Ernst & Young LLP Advisory Health practice reported having no value-based reimbursement initiatives and placed a lower priority on bundled payments and alternative payment models than larger systems.

States would be able to waive requirements for insurers to cover the Affordable Care Act (ACA)’s “essential health benefits” (EHBs) under Republican plans to replace the law. The benefits most likely to be waived, however, make up small shares of premiums compared to other costs, according to an analysis from Urban Institute fellows Linda Blumberg, PhD, and John Holahan, PhD.

 

Recent Headlines

Cedars-Sinai, Torrance Memorial propose affiliation

Two large hospitals in the Los Angeles area would be under the same parent organization under a proposed affiliation plan announced by Cedars-Sinai and Torrance Memorial Medical Center.

Geisinger, Highmark pursuing joint venture on new care model

Geisinger Health System and insurer Highmark have signed a letter of intent for a new joint venture to develop a new clinical network and reimbursement in four Pennsylvania counties.

New Stanford children’s hospital set to open in December

New renderings have been released of the new pediatric and obstetric hospital campus at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, which is now slated to open in December, five years after the groundbreaking for the facility. 

ACO achieved sustainable cost reduction through care management program

By focusing on beneficiaries with high risks of future spending and steering care away from emergency departments, one participant in the Pioneer ACO model offered a scalable program which can achieve sustainable decreases in care costs, according to a study in the May 2017 issue of Health Affairs.

For patients, structural integration doesn’t always mean integrated care

Structurally integrating a medical group may not mean patients see the care its delivering as integrated, according to a study published in the May 2017 issue of Health Affairs.

First physician license approved under interstate compact

Two years after the first states passed legislation adopting the Interstate Medical Licensure Compact (ILMC), the first license has allowing a physician to practice across state lines has been approved.

Children’s healthcare rankings: Vermont named No. 1, Nevada last among states

Judging by 28 different metrics, Vermont offers the highest-quality and most cost-efficient care for children, according to a new study from personal finance website WalletHub, while Nevada struggles with limited access to care and poor oral health among those under the age of 18. 

ACO success limited by high turnover among physicians, patients

The effectiveness of accountable care organizations (ACOs) may be limited by two factors, according to a new study published in Health Affairs: low numbers of enrollees attributed to participating physicians and the constant “churn” of the patient population caused by substantial physician turnover.

Michigan ER doc charged with performing genital mutilation on 7-year-olds

An emergency physician from Michigan has been arrested on charges she performed genital mutilation procedures on multiple girls between the ages of 6 and 8, which prosecutors say could be the first criminal case involving the practice since it was outlawed in the U.S. in 1996.

What U.S. hospitals can learn from a value-based strategy in the Netherlands

While healthcare costs continued to rise at other facilities, one Netherlands hospital was able to lower costs by 8 percent in a single year while improving quality. The credit goes to a value-based care strategy focusing on everything from closer coordination on cardiovascular patients to keeping more experienced physicians in the emergency department. 

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